Instructors

Photo of Emily Leon

Emily Leon

My name is Emily Leon (Chagluak). My parents are Gabriel and Kathryn Chagluak. I grew up in the predominantly Yupik village of Toksook Bay, which is located on the southwestern coast of Alaska. I am married to the wonderful Alex Leon, and together we have two beautiful children, Andrew and Rachel. Frozen Stitches began with the gift of a qaspeq to a dear friend of mine.…Read More

My name is Emily Leon (Chagluak). My parents are Gabriel and Kathryn Chagluak. I grew up in the predominantly Yupik village of Toksook Bay, which is located on the southwestern coast of Alaska. I am married to the wonderful Alex Leon, and together we have two beautiful children, Andrew and Rachel.
Frozen Stitches began with the gift of a qaspeq to a dear friend of mine. Soon after, all the ladies in the office inquired about buying a qaspeq from me. The rest, as they say, “is history!”

Photo of Steve Levey

Steve Levey

Steve Levey has an MA in history from the University of Colorado. He taught high school history for ten years. Many of his students in Honors World History at West Valley High School took the World History AP test without AP-specific preparation. His class, World History: An Early College Survey Course, started as a whimsical dare from a colleague and a challenge to students.…Read More

Steve Levey has an MA in history from the University of Colorado. He taught high school history for ten years. Many of his students in Honors World History at West Valley High School took the World History AP test without AP-specific preparation. His class, World History: An Early College Survey Course, started as a whimsical dare from a colleague and a challenge to students. Over the years, all but one student passed the exam to merit college credit for their achievement in 10th grade.

Photo of Blaine Lunsford

Blaine Lunsford

Blaine has worked with natural dyes for over seven years as well as dyers from around the world. She weaves storytelling, the science of play, and indigenous epistemology into her workshops, inviting an atmosphere centered around ecology, relationship to the land, and artistic expression. Blaine has taught workshops in the summers in Fairbanks over the years, visiting from Canada.…Read More

Blaine has worked with natural dyes for over seven years as well as dyers from around the world. She weaves storytelling, the science of play, and indigenous epistemology into her workshops, inviting an atmosphere centered around ecology, relationship to the land, and artistic expression. Blaine has taught workshops in the summers in Fairbanks over the years, visiting from Canada. She officially moved to Alaska earlier this year and works for Fairbanks Arts Association. As a facilitator, she is passionate about creating accessible containers for folks to learn about natural dyeing to utilize learned skills and techniques at home.

Photo of Karen Magnuson-Sherwood

Karen Magnuson-Sherwood

Karen Magnuson-Sherwood began her basket weaving journey creating purposeful containers useful for wilderness survival. The materials she used were efficiently prepared after gathered from forests or field. Over the last 35 years Karen’s understanding of natural materials along with her refinement of weaving techniques has allowed a greater understanding of the enormous skill possessed by early basket makers.  …Read More

Karen Magnuson-Sherwood began her basket weaving journey creating purposeful containers useful for wilderness survival. The materials she used were efficiently prepared after gathered from forests or field. Over the last 35 years Karen’s understanding of natural materials along with her refinement of weaving techniques has allowed a greater understanding of the enormous skill possessed by early basket makers.  She carries a passion for exploring historic basketry techniques and styles and brings this to her work, in part, by harvesting and preparing her own materials.

My commitment for weaving “working” baskets remains strong, however, I realize clearly that basket making is an evolution, a fluid process where we weave a part of ourselves into each piece. We try to understand a basket’s history while creating something unique and personal.  With connections to the plants and their remarkable uses, and gratitude for the linage that brought the understanding of weaving forward, each project becomes a unique blend of past and present. It is with this vision we hope to honor the plants and the traditions they have grown from to give insight to, not only the past, but how it can illuminate our future.

Karen teaches ethnobotany programs with the Washington State Department of Ecology. She leads online and in-person classes sharing over 40 years of experience teaching the identification and traditions surrounding of wild edible and medicinal plants. Karen leads basketry classes throughout the country and as well as other earth centered programs through Earthwalk Northwest, a wilderness school she co-founded and directs.

Photo of John Manthei

John Manthei

John has been a carpenter/cabinetmaker for nearly half a century and now spends a considerable amount of time teaching through The Folk School. He is one of the founders of Week in the Woods and The Folk School. John's intimate connection to the land and rivers of the interior drives most everything he does. john@folk.schoolRead More

John has been a carpenter/cabinetmaker for nearly half a century and now spends a considerable amount of time teaching through The Folk School. He is one of the founders of Week in the Woods and The Folk School. John’s intimate connection to the land and rivers of the interior drives most everything he does.
john@folk.school

Photo of Phil Marshall

Phil Marshall

Phil has studied traditional hand woodcarving in Austria and Norway, and studied under German and Italian masters in the U.S.  “Woodworking smooths and hones my life. This revelation surprised me twenty-three years ago when I tried my hand at woodcarving. There had never been any signs this pursuit would become such a joy. I had not manifested artistic talent.…Read More

Phil has studied traditional hand woodcarving in Austria and Norway, and studied under German and Italian masters in the U.S.  “Woodworking smooths and hones my life. This revelation surprised me twenty-three years ago when I tried my hand at woodcarving. There had never been any signs this pursuit would become such a joy. I had not manifested artistic talent. But a visit to a remote Colorado gallery of hand-carved, wooden sculpture inspired my wife to present me with a set of beginner’s chisels and gouges; I grabbed an instruction booklet and gave it a go, solo. Perhaps she had sensed something I had not: the time was right in my life for the conjunction of hand, head and heart. Quite unforseen was the equanimity this handcraft brought. Hitherto, many of my endeavors had been struggles full of frustration. This woodcraft flowed calmly, full of acceptance, even with setbacks. Here was a clear, inexplicable pleasure replete with satisfaction even with miniscule advances, nay reverses, in pursuing the skill.

If we join to grow together, I shall try to nurture this fulfillment for you by sharing in small, definite steps; reinforcing them frequently; sequencing them slowly to handle growing complexity; and then bringing it all together in a supportive manner to reduce stress. I proffer a hand for you to discern your destiny.”

Photo of Steve & Sarah Masterman

Steve & Sarah Masterman

Steve and Sarah Masterman have an orchard producing apples, plums, cherries, honeyberries, and saskatoons in the Cripple Creek Neighborhood of Fairbanks. They have pear trees too, but it would be an exaggeration to call those productive. They sell grafted fruit trees and do a small U-pick in their orchard. They've been teaching grafting classes for several years.Read More

Steve and Sarah Masterman have an orchard producing apples, plums, cherries, honeyberries, and saskatoons in the Cripple Creek Neighborhood of Fairbanks. They have pear trees too, but it would be an exaggeration to call those productive. They sell grafted fruit trees and do a small U-pick in their orchard. They’ve been teaching grafting classes for several years.

Photo of Carol McIntyre

Carol McIntyre

Carol McIntyre is a Wildlife Biologist with Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. She started studying the ecology of Golden Eagles and other birds in Denali in 1987. She has published the results of her studies in scientific journals and co-authored the Birds of the World Golden Eagle species account and the book, Birds of Denali.…Read More

Carol McIntyre is a Wildlife Biologist with Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. She started studying the ecology of Golden Eagles and other birds in Denali in 1987. She has published the results of her studies in scientific journals and co-authored the Birds of the World Golden Eagle species account and the book, Birds of Denali. Carol was elected a Fellow of the American Ornithologists’ Union in 2016 and presented with the Raptor Research Foundation’s Fran and Frederick Hamerstrom Award in 2021. When she isn’t in the field studying birds, she’s out on the trail with her husband Ray and their small team of very large Alaska sled dogs.

Photo of Kendalyn Mckisick

Kendalyn Mckisick

Kendalyn Mckisick is a recent creative writing MFA graduate of UAF who now lives in Anchorage. Though she has spent the past few years in Fairbanks writing poetry and teaching writing, she is originally from Little Rock, Arkansas, where she taught several vegan cooking classes and owned a restaurant specializing in raw vegan options with "cooked food Fridays".…Read More

Kendalyn Mckisick is a recent creative writing MFA graduate of UAF who now lives in Anchorage. Though she has spent the past few years in Fairbanks writing poetry and teaching writing, she is originally from Little Rock, Arkansas, where she taught several vegan cooking classes and owned a restaurant specializing in raw vegan options with “cooked food Fridays”. She is passionate about food literacy and showing others how to prepare delicious plant-based meals for longer, happier, and healthier lives.
krmckisick@gmail.com

Photo of Amy Meissner

Amy Meissner

Anchorage artist, Amy Meissner, teaches the Craft of Repair as an act of prolonging, care, and accompaniment of vulnerable objects in transition. This community-based work complements her solitary studio practice that combines handwork, found objects, and abandoned textiles to further complicate the literal, physical, and emotional labor of women. With a background in clothing design and illustration, she holds an MFA in Creative Writing, an MA in Critical Craft Studies, and has taught garment repair in-person and online internationally.…Read More

Anchorage artist, Amy Meissner, teaches the Craft of Repair as an act of prolonging, care, and accompaniment of vulnerable objects in transition. This community-based work complements her solitary studio practice that combines handwork, found objects, and abandoned textiles to further complicate the literal, physical, and emotional labor of women. With a background in clothing design and illustration, she holds an MFA in Creative Writing, an MA in Critical Craft Studies, and has taught garment repair in-person and online internationally. Awards include grants from the Rasmuson Foundation, the Sustainable Arts Foundation, and most recently a 2023 Center for Craft Teaching Artist Cohort grant to focus on the Craft of Repair in both her studio and socially engaged practices.

No Photo Available

Royce Miller

Royce Miller was raised in northwest Montana and worked in construction and fabrication for 40 some years. Royce has a lifelong passion for boats and water and has built a number of boats in aluminum, cedar strip, stitch and glue, skin on frame, and glued lapstrake.Read More

Royce Miller was raised in northwest Montana and worked in construction and fabrication for 40 some years. Royce has a lifelong passion for boats and water and has built a number of boats in aluminum, cedar strip, stitch and glue, skin on frame, and glued lapstrake.

Photo of Emily Gervaise Moran

Emily Gervaise Moran

Emily Gervaise Moran is a musician, artist, teacher, and healer. A lifelong spiritual seeker, Emily’s journey took an unquestionable leap forward when she discovered that she had obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in adulthood. She experienced profound transformation and awakening using yoga, meditation, and other creative modalities to heal from OCD, and has made it her mission to share her unique approach to healing with others.…Read More

Emily Gervaise Moran is a musician, artist, teacher, and healer. A lifelong spiritual seeker, Emily’s journey took an unquestionable leap forward when she discovered that she had obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in adulthood. She experienced profound transformation and awakening using yoga, meditation, and other creative modalities to heal from OCD, and has made it her mission to share her unique approach to healing with others.

Emily holds a Bachelor of Music degree from Berklee College of Music, where she studied Contemporary Writing & Production. She is a gifted composer, performer, and producer, and creates music under the name Aurora Birch. Along with her father, Emily is the Co-Director of the New Rising Sun Center, a community center for ecological & cultural regeneration in Ganges, Michigan. When not creating & teaching, Emily spends her time tending her herd of goats & livestock guardian dogs.

Photo of Naomi Morris

Naomi Morris

Naomi grew up in Cordova, Alaska and enjoyed baking from an early age, taught by her mother who would make all kinds of delicious treats, especially at Christmas. She studied biology at UAF and has worked in Anchorage, Denali, and Fairbanks as a Park Ranger and Environmental Educator. She dived into baking sourdough about 7 years ago and was instantly hooked by the fascinating alchemy, simplicity, and flavor of this type of baking.Read More

Naomi grew up in Cordova, Alaska and enjoyed baking from an early age, taught by her mother who would make all kinds of delicious treats, especially at Christmas. She studied biology at UAF and has worked in Anchorage, Denali, and Fairbanks as a Park Ranger and Environmental Educator. She dived into baking sourdough about 7 years ago and was instantly hooked by the fascinating alchemy, simplicity, and flavor of this type of baking.

Photo of Jennifer Moss

Jennifer Moss

Jennifer Moss spent her childhood on the Appalachian Plateau of Tennessee and Kentucky. She was surrounded by musical influences that flowed through her life and eventually led her to discover the art of the crankie through the music of the old-time duo Anna & Elizabeth. A while ago, Moss took up the ukulele, guitar, and kitchen spoons (which she learned from her grandfather as a child) and has been playing music and making crankies ever since.…Read More
Jennifer Moss spent her childhood on the Appalachian Plateau of Tennessee and Kentucky. She was surrounded by musical influences that flowed through her life and eventually led her to discover the art of the crankie through the music of the old-time duo Anna & Elizabeth. A while ago, Moss took up the ukulele, guitar, and kitchen spoons (which she learned from her grandfather as a child) and has been playing music and making crankies ever since. What inspires her most about crankies is their simple but sometimes powerful analog visual storytelling, especially when paired with music and shadow puppetry. Moss is an instructional designer and adjunct faculty at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She is also a professional artist who loves to incorporate story into her work. Learn more about Moss and view her artwork at: jmossart.com.
Photo of Brett Nelson

Brett Nelson

Brett is originally from Minnesota and has lived in Fairbanks for 25 years, with some time in Michigan along the way. Always enjoying the outdoors (hiking, canoeing, skiing and fishing), he was encouraged for many years to take up wood carving by his mother-in-law who was a master carver in Minnesota. Finally after taking a spoon carving class from John Manthei a number of years ago, Brett started to see 'spoons' in the birch logs while splitting firewood.…Read More

Brett is originally from Minnesota and has lived in Fairbanks for 25 years, with some time in Michigan along the way. Always enjoying the outdoors (hiking, canoeing, skiing and fishing), he was encouraged for many years to take up wood carving by his mother-in-law who was a master carver in Minnesota. Finally after taking a spoon carving class from John Manthei a number of years ago, Brett started to see ‘spoons’ in the birch logs while splitting firewood. Still gathering firewood, he now is also always on the lookout for spoons, kuksas, spreaders, and coffee scoops that may be in the wood.

Photo of Nick Nugent

Nick Nugent

Nick Nugent was born in west central Indiana and grew up there. He was in Cub and Boy Scouts. He was also a Merit Badge Counselor for the Midnight Sun Council while his son was in scouting. He has been in Fairbanks since July of 1977. Nick enjoys primitive outdoor skills. Nick studies Alaska History and more broadly the history of North America prior to 1840.…Read More

Nick Nugent was born in west central Indiana and grew up there. He was in Cub and Boy Scouts. He was also a Merit Badge Counselor for the Midnight Sun Council while his son was in scouting. He has been in Fairbanks since July of 1977. Nick enjoys primitive outdoor skills. Nick studies Alaska History and more broadly the history of North America prior to 1840. His interests also range to the use of carbide lamps and vintage pressure stoves.

Photo of Bill O’Malley

Bill O’Malley

Bill O'Malley is a long-time arts educator experienced in cross-discipline education and collaboration, comfortable in both urban and wilderness environments. Bill was born and raised in Santa Barbara County, California and has been sharing his love of art as an educator for over 20 years. Along with teaching art, he has worked doing installation, public programming, and as a working artist running a small gallery.…Read More

Bill O’Malley is a long-time arts educator experienced in cross-discipline education and collaboration, comfortable in both urban and wilderness environments. Bill was born and raised in Santa Barbara County, California and has been sharing his love of art as an educator for over 20 years. Along with teaching art, he has worked doing installation, public programming, and as a working artist running a small gallery. Since moving to Fairbanks, he has been fortunate enough to work with many local organizations including Camp Habitat, Calypso Farms, and Boreal Sun Charter School. He is excited to be joining The Folk School program and looking forward to a summer filled with art and adventure.

Photo of Carolyn Parker

Carolyn Parker

Carolyn has done botanical surveys throughout Alaska and in other far northern landscapes for over 30 years. The rest of the time she stays based at the University of Alaska Museum while gardening, hiking and ski-joring in the boreal forest around Fairbanks.Read More

Carolyn has done botanical surveys throughout Alaska and in other far northern landscapes for over 30 years. The rest of the time she stays based at the University of Alaska Museum while gardening, hiking and ski-joring in the boreal forest around Fairbanks.

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Kaari Parrish

Kaari has lived in the Interior since 1974. She has been obsessed with fiber and textiles her whole life and has been fascinated by weaving since her first class in 1995. A main focus in recent years has been on narrow bands and the techniques used to both produce the yarn needed and weave them. Most of her yarn has been spun by walking the dog.Read More

Kaari has lived in the Interior since 1974. She has been obsessed with fiber and textiles her whole life and has been fascinated by weaving since her first class in 1995. A main focus in recent years has been on narrow bands and the techniques used to both produce the yarn needed and weave them. Most of her yarn has been spun by walking the dog.

Photo of John Peirce

John Peirce

John began woodworking in earnest in 1985 when he apprenticed with Maine furniture maker David Margonelli. About the same time he discovered green woodworking. Guided by books by Drew Langsner, J Alexander and Roy Underhill, he started with post and rung chairs and snowshoes. Over the years has made spoons, kuksas, wooden skis, and other items beginning with a freshly cut tree rather than lumber yard wood.…Read More

John began woodworking in earnest in 1985 when he apprenticed with Maine furniture maker David Margonelli. About the same time he discovered green woodworking. Guided by books by Drew Langsner, J Alexander and Roy Underhill, he started with post and rung chairs and snowshoes. Over the years has made spoons, kuksas, wooden skis, and other items beginning with a freshly cut tree rather than lumber yard wood. Currently John does cabinets and carpentry as Boreal Woodworks to pay the bills, but for fun he works on boats, bowls, and bodgers benches!